Masked Hearts – Authors’ Interviews

Masked Hearts – Authors’ Interviews

I worked with all five authors who wrote for Masked Hearts,
2016-03-16_Masked Hearts Cover Revealand through our emails bouncing back-and-forth fell in love with their talented works. Each is so individual, even under the umbrella of the titular theme, I could not settle on any single question to do justice to each author and her story.

So instead of asking the same one or two questions of all the authors, I sent out a list and said “Pick any three”. Here you’ll gain an insight into each author, revealed by their choice of questions as well as the answers given.

Thank you, all…

Dana Wright — Affinity

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? (If you write more than one… How do you balance them?)
    I do write in more than one genre and to be honest it is a challenge to keep them balanced. Under another pen name, I write erotic romance and since things have taken off it has been a crunch to keep up with my day job and both writing styles.
    As to the why…I believe people are more than one sided. I love to watch different kinds of movies and read all sorts of books. It makes sense to me that I write romance, horror, YA and erotic romance because I love to do it. You might even occasionally find me writing a picture book or poetry. Words are fun.
  2. How do you feel about e-books vs. print books?
    That’s a good question. E-books have opened up an entirely new world to both authors and readers. I work in a bookstore, so I see both sides of the coin. As a multi-published author, e-books have helped me achieve a dream.
    But there is a certain type of reader who will only pick up physical books in a bookstore and will never embrace digital media. It can be a challenge to harness both, but that is my goal. I will continue to work on my digital material but I also have goals to get my books into bookstores.
  3. You’ve already done interviews…:What question do you wish someone would ask about your book, but nobody has? “Oh wow. I think I would love for someone to ask for a longer novel based on the story in the book. “
    3a And…your answer?
    I loved it [the story], so the answer would be ‘yes’.

Claire Devon — Water Woman:

  1. How do you feel about e-books vs. print books?
    As a hybrid author with Kindle on my phone, I appreciate the ease of e-books.
    As a person of “a certain age” who enjoys the visceral feel of a book, I prefer paperbacks. There is room for both and both have merit. It’s easier to lend your paperback around to others (if you can bear to let it out of your sight).
  2. Of all the books or shorts you have written, which would you most like to see adapted for the screen?
    Without question, the first in my Elementals’ Challenge series called “Fire Danger.”
    2a How would you adapt it?
    It would not be hard, since it is set in today’s world with an overlay of the paranormal, and the FX are already there for flying people, fire beings, dragons and other creatures. The challenge would be in properly capturing the love story between the two main characters, while still imparting the sense of danger that the world building creates in the book.
  3. You’ve done many interviews…What question do you wish someone would ask about your book, but nobody has?
    “Why did you choose the location you chose for “Water Woman?” What made you choose the types of creatures you chose instead of wolves/vampires, etc.?”
    3a And…the answer?
    I noticed about a year ago I was keeping in my comfort zone about certain locations. I also have seen a tendency for the same sort of paranormal types to surface again and again in our literature. It is a big world out there with many types of interesting beings and I wanted to tackle those. That’s why you’ll see paranormals in my work which you’re less likely to see in others. I hope the reader likes what I’m trying to do.

Sharon Hughson — Duty Or Desire

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? (If you write more than one… How do you balance them?)
    I have published works of women’s fiction, sweet romance, young adult fantasy, non-fiction Bible studies and devotionals, and now fantasy romance (as well as poetry). My preferred genre is young adult fantasy, but writing romance comes naturally to me since that is what I read the most of for YEARS.
    As for balancing all these…I’m still working on that. At the moment, I try to focus my novel writing skills on young adult fantasy since it’s where I want to be.
  2. Of all the books or shorts you’ve written, which would you prefer a reader to read first, in order to “get” you and your style?
    I think the story “The Demon Was Me” (coming out in October in Month9Book’s In The Beginning anthology) is where I would love readers to start. It is my only published young adult story. It is a dark biblical retelling I set in a dystopian world. Readers can see what I want to accomplish with my written words through this story.
  3. You’ve done many interviews…What question do you wish someone would ask about your book, but nobody has?
    “Isn’t fiction all about entertainment? Why do you choose to entertain rather than educate?”
    3aAnd…the answer?
    As an educator, I realize that the best way to teach someone is to get them having fun first. Do I hope my stories entertain readers? Yes. But I also hope they will see the deeper messages embedded in the theme and subtext. In the case of “Duty or Desire,” one of my themes states we give one of these two things top billing – duty for me since I was taught to finish the work first before I could play. However, true contentment is a balance of both, although perhaps not in equal measure. All of my stories have more than one subliminal message.

Sheryl Winters — Feather Fall

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?
    The story chooses me. First comes the vision, the images of certain characters. These “people,” could be swimming or dancing or just talking over coffee. My job is to find out why they are doing what they are doing, then the story begins to evolve and the story becomes a lovely Jigsaw puzzle. One piece leads to the other until I wake up and find I’ve “fallen in love,” with my story.
  2. How do you feel about e-books vs. print books?
    I love both. E-books are very nice when I’m at work at lunch. I can never settle to just one before I leave the house. Having a handful of books to read at any time, say the airport, the hospital, stuck at work during my lunch hour is an awesome feeling.
    However, some books, usually Fantasy with a touch of Dragons, I want in print. I want to sniff the pages and feel the weight in my hands as I flip through the pages.
  3. You’ve done many interviews…What question do you wish someone would ask about your book, but nobody has?
    “If you could meet any one of your characters who would you meet and why?”
    3a And…the answer?
    I would love to meet one of the Ra’von or Draven from Skydreamer, one of the seriously good-looking males from Skydreamer. Prince Ra’von, in particular, would be fun to interview. After all, he’s not only seriously good looking but is the most gentle-hearted man. He’s also a dragon-shifter, and I’d like to know a few things about them. Do they enjoy killing griffons or is it more of a cultural thing? When they are flying, what keeps them up? Magic, wing power, wind velocity, etc.. So many questions that I know he has the answer to.

Nemma Wollenfang — Dragon Law

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? (If you write more than one how do you balance them?)
    I write in several genres: fantasy, historical, dystopian, sci-fi… I find it isn’t a choice as such, the story leads you into those different fields like a dog pulling on a leash. Always though, I like to have a romantic element. Sometimes it is a bit of a balancing act when moving between works and I have to take care not to slip from one style into another. Reading the same genre before starting to write can help set my mind on the right track. Sometimes, though, they cross-over quite naturally, for example, I’m currently working on a historical sci-fi set in an alternative version of Victorian-era London.
  2. How do you feel about e-books vs. print books?
    I’ve always been a print book fan. I like to feel the pages, have my own personal copy, and have books stacked around me. It’s a comfort thing. And when I settle down with a paperback there’s no temptation to flick onto the internet, I can cut the world out and focus only on the book.
    But at the same time I’ve read, and become completely engrossed with, a lot of fantastic fiction that’s only available online or in e-book format. So I think e-books have made fiction much more accessible — but I will always love print books.
  3. What question do you wish someone would ask about your book, but nobody has? “Writers often have to contend with distractions – what are your worst?”
    3a. And…the answer?
    My worst distraction is cats. I volunteer at a local cat rescue and I’ve adopted several of the adorable little monsters. I get nipped, kicked and patted while trying to write, until I relent and pay attention. Several times after leaving my computer I’ve returned to find sudden… additions… to works-in-progress. Always illegible. They can be a BIG distraction, yes, but they can be an inspiration too. It’s been while I’ve been working at the rescue that I’ve had some of my biggest ‘Eureka!’ moments with stories. Several of their names might have also slipped into my fiction too…

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