Choosing your Editor

The following are questions for you, the author, to ask the freelance editor you are considering approaching. Originally by Jenny, for the website Writers Edit

Pexels-photo-220312 onPixabay
Picture by Pexel, on Pixabay.com

What should I ask a prospective editor?

  1. If they have any qualifications or memberships.
    You might prefer someone with the theoretical grounding of a degree or certificate, or someone who upholds the standards of an editing society.
  2. If they have experience or a portfolio.
    Do you want the seasoned veteran who’s been in the game for twenty plus years, or the enthusiastic novice who’s just starting out?
  3. How and what they charge.
    {For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2IyGJ3n}
  4. What systems they use to edit.
    Are they on a Mac or a PC? Do they prefer MS Word, Adobe Acrobat or InDesign (or hard copy)? Be sure that your systems are compatible.
  5. If they respond quickly to enquiries.
    As we said, editing is all about communication, so make sure they’ll give you the time of day rather than ignore your email for a week.
  6. If they seem honest and respectful.
    You want your editor to be upfront, but not insensitive. There’s a difference between telling someone that their writing needs improvement and telling them it’s garbage.
  7. If they genuinely appreciate the story you have to tell.
    Editors who believe in your writing will be more committed to its success, and will thus be more likely to go the extra mile on your behalf.
  8. If they respect the boundaries between author and editor.
    At the end of the day, it’s your work: will they give you the final word, or will they try to steamroll you, based on what they think is right?
  9. If they know what they’re talking about!
    Do they know what a style guide is? Can they justify their editorial decisions? Or are you the one having to explain the difference between en- and em-dashes?

A post on using Brand-names in your writing

This stellar advice can be found at this blog, by Mark Fowler at Blogspot, an attorney in New York City with 29 years of experience working for media companies – book and magazine publishers, newspapers, broadcasters, and online publishers, among others.

A full description of the what and how of dropping names into your writing

Thanks, Mark…

 

PSA Regarding Amazon Guidelines for Reviews

Woah! Do people Still not realise this? Here’s a reminder…

Shotgun Logic

Amazon-Logo_Feature

PSA to reviewers and authors/publishers regarding Amazon’s revised review guidelines.

This little bit here is super important to observe:

“Book authors and publishers may continue to provide free or discounted copies of their books to readers, as long as the author or publisher does not require a review in exchange or attempt to influence the review.”

This means that technically speaking, an author/publisher should not require a review in exchange for a book. Instead, offer the book for consideration. In my experience, that is the approach most industry professionals take anyway, so no major change there for most.

More importantly, it means that reviewers need to drop language such as the following from their reviews: “I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.” As far as Amazon is concerned, this means you were paid for a review and they will yank your review. Even more importantly, if they…

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