Guest Review: Caught Up in Time

Final Front Cover_Caught U I TimeWriter Mollie Smith provides her review of Caught Up in Time, by Paora Panadelo.

(Red Penn edited this NZ historical fiction)

Paora Panadelo

Paora Panadelo, aka Paul Baker, has written a book which immediately appealed to my love of history with Caught Up in Time.

The book, based on actual events and people, takes you on a trip through roughly forty raucous, witty, racy, and occasionally poignant years with interwoven stories, songs, and photographs to accompany.

We tend to see the past through rose-coloured glasses, but this book is a no-holds barred look at life in post-WWII New Zealand from the 40s to the 70s, and Panadelo tackles issues which we didn’t want to admit to having back then (just as we don’t want to admit having them now).

Easy to read and highly entertaining

4.5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed by Mollie Smith

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“Caught Up In Time” by Paora Panadelo

New book takes a look at usFinal Front Cover_Caught U I Time

TITLE: Caught Up In Time

AUTHOR: Paora Panadelo

A cleverly constructed walk down memory lane spanning four decades – with much of the action obviously involving Wairarapa – promises to appeal to those who like a good, racy story based on actual events.
Although marketed as a work of fiction, the underlying theme of this just-released book is strongly influenced by actual happenings, and actual people.

New author Paora Panadelo, a pen name being used by a former Masterton journalist,  has managed to merge events covering the 1940s to the 1970s into a riveting read for those who don’t mind acquainting themselves with not only the smooth but also the rougher side of life.
The era is the domain of the baby boomers and life in those now far-off days bears little resemblance to what young people believe life to be today.
It can be categorised as a time of far less affluence, a time when our country was not only recovering from the effects of World War II but was trying to find its feet socially.
Panadelo pulls no punches, whether it be chapters that involves poverty, hooligan behaviour, broken  relationships or under-age sex.
The book also has its softer side, a caring side – and looks at issues such as the union movement, the somewhat contentious arrivals of “yankee” servicemen and their impact on New Zealand women.
The author has interlaced the various stories that interlock in the book with verse and song lyrics to match the era, along with an array of photographs that will re-kindle many memories in readers.
All-in-all it’s a good first-up effort and, at 212 pages, is an easy and entertaining read.

REVIEW: Don Farmer, Wairarapa Times-Age
Posted with permission
Caught Up In Time can be purchased at bookshops in NZ featuring Local Books,
or by contacting the author directly.

(paul hyphen baker at xtra dot co dot nz)

Hounds of the Underworld- authors’ interview

Aren’t writers supposed to be solitary?

cover_Hounds of the Underworld
Cover designed by Daniele Serra

 

  • Dan Rabarts: That’s just a myth we like to maintain so we don’t have to invite anyone to our parties. Writers are actually about as social as spider monkeys, and we like to do many of the same things when we’re together: eat our bananas upside-down, groom each other for tasty insects, that sort of thing. But we keep this top secret because if everyone knew, everyone would want to be writers and come to our parties.
  • Lee Murray: It’s not exactly a party! There’s definitely a myth circulating that writing is a solitary occupation, and yet I don’t know any successful writer who works entirely in isolation, even those not writing in collaboration. Obviously, there are times when you have to glue your bottom to the chair, put your head down, and churn out the words, but most writers will contact experts to support their work, send early drafts out to a critique group or writing buddy, and then, when draft is completed, beta-readers and editors move in, all of whom contribute to the work in different ways. As far as I can tell, writing a novel is always a collaborative process.

How did you come to collaborate with each other?

  • Dan: A little book called Baby Teeth kicked it all off. I had a crazy idea and got some people on board and realised I’d bitten off more than I could chew, no pun intended. Lee stepped up to help pull it all together.
  • Lee: I think with Baby Teeth – a charity project ‒ the way the anthology came together was atypical, with stories coming in from both established and emerging writers, so from an editing perspective, it was always going to be a challenge. Professionally, Dan and I brought different skill sets to the table and we tried to make it fun and not too intimidating for the newbies. Ask any of the writers: it was like a comedy routine going on in the margins, the pair of us battling it out, trying to find the best way to polish the text. On the way we both learned some new techniques, which we carried over into our individual projects. By the time Baby Teeth went on to win the Australian Shadows and Sir Julius Vogel awards it was clear the partnership was something we should explore further. I threw it out there, and Dan said, why not? But ours is more than just a professional arrangement. On a personal level, we clicked from the get-go. We’re friends: I love Dan’s sense of humour, his can-do attitude, and his wonderfully weird and twisted way of thinking. And the great thing is, our families get on too ‒ we both have incredibly supportive long-suffering spouses ‒ so when we can, we get our kids together, crack open a few drinks, and fire up the BBQ. It’s not all work.

How did you split the collaboration process – decide who contributed what?

  • Lee: Hounds of the Underworld is a he-said she-said narrative, with me writing the science consultant Penny Yee, and Dan writing her ex-con brother, Matiu. So while we each contribute to the development of the other characters, it’s as if we have ownership of those particular story threads. In terms of process, the Dan and Lee approach is an odd mixture of planning and ‘pantsting’, with doses of affectionate squabbling. In fact, the sensible big sister and subversive little brother roles of Penny and Matiu apply to our writing process too, where I am the big sister who knows best and Dan has the crazy go-off-on-a-tangent ideas. Broadly speaking, we have an idea of where we want the story arc to go, but I never quite know what to expect when I open Dan’s latest section, exactly where he’ll have taken a scene. Down some dark alleyway, usually! Working with Dan definitely means taking the story to another dimension.
  • Dan: Yip, we manage to keep this balance of driving the narrative forward in our own ways: Lee with solid research and plausibility, and me with random unexplained explosions. But we frequently sit down during the process and make sure that, at least to some extent, we’re working towards the same goal. The push-pull dynamic that Penny and Matiu share to get their results isn’t that far removed from our collaborative process.

Tell us about the most {worrying / enjoyable} part of collaborating?

  • Dan: Worrying? There’s always the risk that one of us will be abducted by aliens or otherwise removed from the process, and the one that’s left will have to not only pretend to be the other writer, mimic their style, fall into their ideas, take ownership of plot points we’ve deliberately maintained some distance from, but also knowing we’d have to maintain the other person’s social media profiles until the aliens release them back into the wild. All those hashtags. So many hashtags.
  • Lee: {rolls her eyes} Lynne, please don’t get him started. I’m going to open up the next section of the sequel and find it has aliens in it now, aren’t I? The downside is that people assume we must be married! No, I think the biggest worry is that our lives keep getting in the way. Family. Work. We’ve learned to be flexible.
  • Dan But enjoyable? That’s the magic of it. It’s having an idea which is only half-formed, and bandying it around with someone excited and committed to the project, invested in the world and the characters. Lee will bring something new to that misshapen idea, an unexpected twist that gives it direction and completion, and you have this synergy going on that leads to cool things happening, taking form on the page. Whole is greater than the sum of the parts, sort of thing.
  • Lee: The thing I like is that I only have to write half the book. Actually, collaborating ends up being more work than writing on your own, but being a ponderously slow writer myself, sharing the work helps me with the word-count head games!

With which other writers would you / have you collaborate/d? Tell us about that…

  • Dan: We’ve both collaborated with other writers, and produced some fairly cool works as a result. I’m part of a writing band called Cerberus, which comprises myself, Grant Stone and Matthew Sanborn Smith, and one of our stories, Dada, has appeared in Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine. We produce some extremely weird fiction. But my favourite collaboration outside of the Rabarts/Murray workload right now is a little story called “The People Machines”, which my ten-year-old son and I are writing at bedtime. It’s a story about two boys who get the power to turn into any machine they can imagine, just in time to protect the world from the evil, machine-eating Corlocks. Fart jokes and witty puns abound.
  • Lee: I have a collaborative YA novella, Mika, with YA specialist, Piper Mejia. We’d already worked together on a number of student anthologies, and when I moved to Wellington, the project gave us a reason to talk every week. With Mika, a Kiwi version of the Wizard of Oz, we wrote alternating chapters and then ‘smoothed’ the final text, so it reads like a single writer. I also have a couple of picture books out on submission, both collaborations with Eileen Mueller. But like I said earlier, all writing involves an element of collaboration.

 

 

Tell us what fun and games went into the cover design…

  • Lee: It’s gorgeous, isn’t it? It’s by Italian artist, Daniele Serra. In terms of fun and games, there weren’t any: we sent in some ideas, just concepts really, and it came back perfectly formed.

What’s your favourite way to meet your readers ‒ at book signings, conventions, or other events – and why?

  • Dan: Book launches, for sure. Because that means they might be buying a book. Yay! (Buy books, people. We love you when you buy books.) But otherwise, pretty much anywhere. Bars are good. Personally, I like those impromptu gatherings of a dozen people dropping in on an unsuspecting restaurant downtown somewhere to chinwag and press the flesh and talk books and writing and the deplorable state of American politics while comparing craft beers. Good times.
  • Lee: Any time you meet someone who likes your story. Online. At a launch. Conventions. Anywhere. There’s nothing more uplifting than to know you’ve inspired a reader. I walked into the supermarket once, and a woman came running over to me and said, “You’re that writer lady, aren’t you? You’re doing so well.” That was pretty special.

Red: Thanks, Dan and Lee for the distance interview

Raw-Dogs-Screaming

Hound of the Underworld can be purchased at
publishers {click the logo to go and buy}

 

 

Hounds of the Underworld, by RABARTS & MURRAY

cover_Hounds of the UnderworldI feel as if Dan or Lee, or both, wrote to the background of AC/DC’s If you want Blood, You’ve got it. Because blood is what links together the best of the worst events in this New Zealand futuristic gripper. Matiu – a “sidekick” to his sister Pandora, is haunted by a spirit being of whom, after his years of therapy, he thought he had gained control. Until he touched a bowl.
A simple bowl, but it draws blackness into him, and he sticks to Pandora’s side throughout her work – unofficially – on a police murder case.
Which evolves into a multiple crime. Penny (Pandora) finds herself in situations a simple lab technician should not need to be in; but she too is gripped by the need for resolution – and by worry over Matiu’s changed state.

Rabarts and Murray have solid research behind the story, set in the 2020s, a future in which is revealed a most plausible system of agricultural production and city life. All the more awful is the juxtaposition of the past spiritual elements against daily life, which chill your bones. You’ll find yourself underlining, highlighting, re-reading…just because you want to.

Here’s one of many passages I loved…underlining mine…


Penny can’t understand why her parents insist on treating her like a twelve year-old. She’d called for a driver, not a damned babysitter. The last thing she needs is Matiu tagging along like a piece of soggy toilet paper stuck to her shoe. She clamps her lips shut and glances back. And just look at him: head down, shoulders slumped, hands stuffed in the pockets of his leather jacket. He’s the one behaving like a sulky teen. Why does he have to go talking to himself when they’re out in public, anyway? Mumbling under his breath to his imaginary friend… She steps through the doorway, noting its splintered frame, and is confronted by a human wookie. Two metres plus, with oversized hands, and long overdue for a haircut.

“Who the fuck are you?” it bellows.

Penny jumps, startled. “I was called…”

Get a grip, Penny. You’re not here to audition for Miss Muffet. You have a right to be here…

“You the lab girl? The one that Noah Cordell recommended? Pandora somebody? Cordell swore you were reliable; I expected you half an hour ago.”

Penny tries not to bristle at the slight. After all, this is work. And apart from a few tests—some simple DNA analyses to resolve a private paternity suit and routine monitoring of the blooms stinking up the city’s beaches—there hasn’t been much cause to turn on the fumehood since she left LysisCo. She squares her shoulders, extends her hand.

Suck it up, girl.


The tone is light, especially that first paragraph I’ve dropped in here. Imagery via words – as underlined – is the strength of their writing. Maybe I could have picked something more thrilling…but not all would be able to not squirm.
Note: expect a distance interview to be posted soon.
Māori language (phrases or words) are used, and a glossary of translations aids the non-kiwi reader.

Publishing details?

Hounds of the Underworld © 2017 by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray
Publisher Raw-Dogs-Screamingof Bowie, MD
First Edition; Printed in the United States of America
Cover Image: Daniele Serra; Book Design: Jennifer Barnes
ISBN: 978-1-935738-96-1

Buy at  Amazon
Read more about Dan and Lee at Red Dog Screaming


More about the Hounds of the Underworld:

 

On the verge of losing her laboratory, her savings, and all respect for herself, Pandora (Penny) Yee lands her first contract as scientific consult to the police department. And with seventeen murder cases on the go, the surly inspector is happy to leave her to it. Only she’s going to need to get around, and that means her slightly unhinged adopted brother, Matiu, will be doing the driving. But something about the case spooks Matiu, something other than the lack of a body in the congealing pool of blood in the locked room or that odd little bowl.

Matiu doesn’t like anything about this case, from the voices that screamed at him when he touched that bowl, to the way his hateful imaginary friend Makere has come back to torment him, to the fact that the victim seems to be tied up with a man from Matiu’s past, a man who takes pleasure in watching dogs tear each other to pieces for profit and entertainment.

Hounds of the Underworld blends mystery, near-future noir and horror. Set in New Zealand it’s the product of a collaboration by two Kiwi authors, one with Chinese heritage and the other Māori. This debut book in The Path of Ra series offers compelling new voices and an exotic perspective on the detective drama.

The Seer’s Wolf, by Barbara PETRIE

The Seer’s WolfThe Seers Wolf x PETRIE
by Barbara Petrie

Wow. I’ve never read a young adult book quite like this, but I’m sure there will be readers out there itching for a book which combines human foibles with fantasy.
    The Seer’s Wolf follows two families in a rural Canterbury (NZ) community: the Fairnies, well established as farmers – practical, down-to-earth, sensitive – and the Randals, recent arrivals just emigrated from England, who bring a curious lifestyle to the community, keeping to themselves.  
    Clover Fairnie, the seer of the title, keeps a journal of visions, events and imaginings, and begins noticing more and more of the strange ways of the Randals, her mother, and the young cattle drover. She notices the closeness between Ralph Randal and his eighteen year old daughter Satina, whom he calls Arkie.
    Winding through the simple tale are threads of home-made herbal remedies, magic mushrooms, frustrated yearnings, the mauling of stock, floods and rescues, and shocking disasters. The quick ‘tidy-up’ of the ending seemed to leave something vaguely unresolved, but a thorough reading and retracing characters dismisses that.  
    At the beginning I found Clover’s journal read like something from Enid Blyton, but the author gets a grip on Clover’s voice, her visions come under the author’s control and are more believable.
    Ms Petrie’s ‘Note To The Reader’ is almost a spoiler, coming before the Table of Contents. So skip it – go straight to page 11, the first page of the story itself. 


Title: The Seer’s Wolf
Author: Barbara Petrie
Publisher: Bridgidada Press
ISBN: 978-0-473-318154 paperback
Available:
as either a pbk or e-book through the publisher’s website: www.bridgidada.nz;
or from Scorpio Books, Christchurch; PaperPlus, Rangiora; Take Note Kaiapoi; and bookshops New Zealand-wide by request. 

VIVIENNES BLOG, by NZ author Stephen LEATON (release mid-January ’15)

eb83c-vivienneVIVIENNE’S  BLOG

Author Stephen K. LEATON
It was a lot easier to read and enjoy Vivienne’s Blog than it has been to write this review. Not wanting to sell it short, I actually spent time refining my understanding of the genres mentioned among the publisher’s material: thriller, chilling suspense, fantastical, psychological thriller, or mystery.
The book’s designer has helped us readers by using alternate fonts, to show Vivienne’s internal thoughts as distinct from her blog entries, or her letters to her ex-husband, to whom her blog is directed.
One of the fascinations is – what is she remembering as real, and what is a fantasy, a psychotic memory, a deranged version of history and truth? As she seeks to both preserve her “Faerie” bloodline and to “punish” her ex-husband and his second wife, we are swept into the maelstrom of her mind – and the suspense is very, very real. Is the baby safe with her? Will she be captured before any danger comes to her or the child?
She is not unintelligent – she reads body language expertly. She plans. She is never taken by surprise, but can make mistakes. At times expressing herself lucidly, yet at times rambling and erratic, we are “in the air” – puzzled as we wonder – what is real and what is Vivienne’s reality?
And as the story and her life ends – Leaton drops us a chilling bombshell.
(Move along…no spoilers here)

Publisher: EUNOIA Publishing Ltd

Date Available: 2015 (mid-January)
ISBN: 978-0-9941047-9-3 Paperback, perfect bound
ISBN: 978-0-9941047-1-7 Leather cover, stitched, ribbon tied, illustrated.
Also will be available in Kindle.
 0afaa-booksellers-logo-001
R.R.P $NZ 34.99 p’back; $NZ 45.00 deluxe edition;
RRPs will vary according to medium, sales channel and purchasing nation.
Has this review helped you decide to purchase? Then please give it a Rating
You can also Share it on the online channel of your choice.
To comment if you are the first: click on the “No comments” hot spot, and the comment window will open. Tell us all about what You thought of the book as a read, or of Leaton as a writer in this novel.
Thank you and have a Happy New Year
– Lynne. –

A History of Crime : The Southern Double-Cross

A HISTORY OF CRIME – The Southern Double-Cross 
By Dinah HOLMAN
Publisher: Ravenbourne Books Ltd, Auckland NZ
© Dinah Holman, 2014
ISBN: 9978-0-473-27278-1
Oh, Ms Holman – let this be the first of such a series, puh-lease? I have not enjoyed such a story before, and I want more like it.
The way you have used your research of historic events and created a parallel history, also a crime story, also a warm romance, to create this thoroughly and beautifully crafted story, has resulted in a thought-provoking and enjoyable read.
Your characters are so well developed and believable, the plot twists so unexpected, the subtle intertwining of the two New Zealand cultures of the day so empathetic – it is almost a shock to read in the Preface and the Postscript the true historic facts which form the foundation on which this story is constructed.
I am writing this after my first read. And after I have posted this to the distributors, I am going to read it again, while I await a possible follow-up. Thank you for this wonderful work!
A HISTORY OF CRIME – The Southern Double-Cross is available in paperback from:
or check it out at the Booksellers NZ site
Notes re author, Dinah Holman:
Dinah Holman, nationally known as a heritage planning consultant, historian and biographer, who has prepared inventories of historic buildings throughout New Zealand, earned the QSO for Public Service to Heritage in 1987 and the N.Z. Planning Institute Distinguished Service Award in 1992.
She has an M.A. (English Hons) and a Diploma in Town Planning. Her previous books, all non-fiction are:
  • ·         Newmarket Lost and Found (2001 and 2010), which received Highly Commended in the J.M. Sherrin Awards in 2001;
  • ·         Fairburn and Friends (2004);
  • ·         Bloody Marvellous, a memoir of George Haydn, (2006)

(More information can be found at the MICHAEL KING WRITERS’CENTRE TRUST

Booksellers Logo Reviewed for Booksellers NZ

So tell us (as a Comment) what you think of this review, the author, or the book. 
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Swimming in the Dark, by Paddy RICHARDSON

This merging of the stories of two distinct families from different locations and times into one interacting tale of misery, fear, hate and hurt, resolves the unfolding drama in a most satisfactory way. Between their two stories are common themes – fear of imposed authority and abuse of power. These themes drive characters and events onward towards the inevitable end. 

The Freemans are a dysfunctional family, with no permanent father figure, a mother who seeks comfort in drink and dubious liaisons, two young adult sons who pretend to work but prefer to deal, the older daughter who ran away from home years ago, and Serena, a young girl who is targeted by the town’s sexual predator but cannot face revealing this. 

The Kleins are a family of mother and daughter, the last of a family of refugees from post-Cold War East Germany – Leipzig. Since arriving in New Zealand, age has taken the father, Oma and Opa (grandma and grandad), leaving Gerda, a former maternity nurse, still believing sometimes that old Russian-controlled Leipzig was a better place, but sometimes wracked with guilt by the discoveries of what the Russian Stasi had been doing to the populace without her knowing. Her daughter Ilse teaches at the local secondary school, and has been nurturing Serena’s unrecognized scholastic ability, giving her hope of getting away to university. 

The story’s swimming refers to the river, a gathering place for teens and families in summer, and Ilse’s place for swimming alone at night. Serena realizes the teens are being watched by a respected member of the community from the bridge, but she feels uncomfortable. His attention towards her escalates to the level of sexual abuse, and rape. She hides the resulting pregnancy as long as she can. Ilse, out one evening for her usual swim, discovers Serena in the beginning stages of labour, alone, frightened and in pain. Taking Serena back home to Ilse, Serena is terrified to let anyone know, so Gerda draws on her skills to successfully deliver Serena’s baby. 

The rapist father, still watching for her, discovers where she is in hiding. How Ilse and Gerda deal with his aggressive arrival in their home is a triumph of rights over fear and victimization, leaving this reviewer wanting to yell in triumph. The story’s conclusion leaves the right characters in the right situation for each, in a quietly triumphant ending.

Publishing: 2014, Upstart Press, Auckland NZ; paperback
ISBN: 978-1-927262-05-4

Reviewed for Booksellers NZ 

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A Taste of Gold, by Deryn Pittar


A Taste of Gold Cover by Sour Cherry Designs
In this cross-over of genre for the author, she has introduced two characters –  twins Levi and Jason, whose skills give them a mental telepathic communication link, and a sensing of precious minerals—gems or metals.
As college age scholars of geology, they are in New Zealand to explore the Coromandel area for its old gold stores. Meeting – unintentionally – two most unsavoury characters, each in different but linked circumstances, initiates a stream of events of excitement, fear, thrills and chills. Criminals both, working together, are thwarted by the boys’ skills. When their booty is turned in to the police by the twins, the criminals determine to find the twins and learn how they managed to find their stashed booty.
While out of town and of the reach of the criminals, they follow the sounds of something precious calling to them, and find an underground chamber with a deep lake spreading across its floor. With the cave piled around with gemstones and gold in the rough, the boys are ecstatic – until the hoard’s guardian arises from the lakes’ depths – a Tāniwha, for whom the chamber is home and the hoard is treasure.
He allows the boys a few of the gemstones – which talk together and to him – to ensure he will learn if they tell anyone of his cave and contents. Those three gems are to become life-savers for Levi in yet another encounter with the two crooks who kidnap him and lock him in a country shed.
What they want him for, how he escapes, how the boys face the local police who have been seeking them, how Levi overcomes his shyness and timidity … you will be riveted to the book to read.
An Evernight Teen publication, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-77130-667-6
Available now from Evernight Teens: bit.ly/19ncFza
And from Amazon: http://amzn.to/IQeT3k   

Comments about this entry, the author, or the book are welcome.
When you’ve read A Taste of Gold, come back and Rate the Book (not this post, please).
Thank you!

TAKA KIRO WAI –He Kōrero Pūrākau mo Tētāhi Hoiho by Keri KAA


TAKA KIRO WAI –
He Kōrero Pūrākau mo Tētāhi Hoiho

Author Keri KAA

Artist Martin D PAGE
 
This Māori language, 59 page picture book is an amazing compilation of story, artwork and photography, decorated and enhanced with examples of Māori weaving and carving patterns.
Publisher Tania was kind enough to relate the story to me in English (I am not bilingual) which I can summarise for you. As a Māori reader, you will get more out of the book than I can, so bear with me.
It is the true story of a rural home, surrounded by farmland, in the area of Ngati Porou, on which after an extremely rainy stormy night, the woman of the house looking out her window realises her mare is in difficulties. On closer investigation, she sees the mare has foaled overnight. The foal is still trapped in the birth sac, and in such deep water the mare cannot assist it to break free.
Friends come to help; they drag the foal onto higher ground, wrap it in a blanket with the hopes of saving the exhausted foal, who is very cold after being submerged in water. The mare is incapable of anything, so exhausted is she after birthing in the night and struggling in the flooded paddock. 
The mare has shared her paddock with a pig, and is used to its smell. The pig comes to the foal, and tears open the birth sac. It licks then rubs against the foal, for so long it tires and drops to rest in exhaustion. It returns to the foal and now starts treading with its forelegs on its back, until finally the foal comes alive. The mare returns, and coaxes the foal to stand and feed.
This book is a strong mixture of the expertise of the story teller and of the illustrator. Every page has its own significance to te tikanga Māori, to rural communities, and to – especially – spell-bound children.
The publishers have assured me there is a solid intention to produce an English language version in the future. I will happily announce that here when it happens.

Translations of the front cover (thanks to publisher Tania)…
Main Title – Taka Kiro Wai = Fell in the water
Sub-title – He Kōrero Pūrākau mo Tētāhi Hoiho = A story about a horse

(Yellow circle sub-subtitle – He Kōrero Pūrākau Tūturu Tēnei = This is a true story

ISBN  978-0-473-18406-3 paperback
Publication 2013 by Tania&Martin, Rotorua NZ.
Book is to be launched 22nd November,
and can be purchased via 
www.taniaandmartin.com/shop

Illustrations here are photographs I took of the review copy I read,
and in no way do justice to the book’s Real art.

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Do Comment about this entry or about the author, or the book. If you have read the book itself, then Rate the Book (not this post, please). Thank you